Back to Abner Peeler's 1882 patent for the first air brush.    -    Airbrush history from The Airbrush Museum featuring Paasche, Wold, Walkup, Iwata, Aerograph, Badger,  and  more! Graphic created using Adobe Illustrator. Airbrush history from The Airbrush Museum featuring Paasche, Wold, Walkup, Iwata, Aerograph, Badger,  and  more! Graphic created using Adobe Illustrator; the font is "Candy." NEXT: Liberty Walkup's 1884 patent.    -   Airbrush history from The Airbrush Museum featuring Paasche, Wold, Walkup, Iwata, Aerograph, Badger,  and  more! Graphic created using Adobe Illustrator.

Liberty Walkup's 1883 Patent

(Click on the picture below to see the full size patent drawing. I've cleaned them up and converted them to the .GIF format. WARNING, they are 80kb+ files and are a slow download but worth it. Opens in a new window!)

The second Airbrush! Liberty Walkup's first patent in his own name is an improved version of Peeler's "paint distributer." In Peeler's original airbrush, the needle was mounted directly to the "wind-wheel" and this limited the reciprocating movement of the needle. To solve this problem, Peeler comes up with the "walking bar." It's a thin bar with a slot running most of its length that is anchored at one end and attached via an arm to the "wind-wheel." The needle has greater movement and stability and can be adjusted to vary the amount of the needle thatís in front of the air blast by turning a lever, thus regulating the spray. Walkup's patent is granted on September 18, 1883.

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If anyone would like copies of any of the patents on the site, e-mail me and I'll gladly send them to you. The files are small in kb size (346kb for the 5 pages of the Peeler patent) but they are physically large (290" x 426") and they are in .TIF format. That means you'll need a viewer that can open .TIF's and resize them. No problem, Irfan View to the rescue. Click on one of the buttons below to go and download it. Its free (although he'd appreciate a postcard) and is the best viewer around. It also plays audio!